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F4E Director strengthens ties with Japanese partners

F4E Events - wo, 16/01/2019 - 01:00
As a step in maintaining and deepening working relationships with our Japanese colleagues, F4E Director Johannes Schwemmer visited Japan.

How to spot the leaks in ITER’s vacuum systems?

F4E News - wo, 16/01/2019 - 01:00
F4E is on a mission to detect and localise them.

Sub-assembly tools | A 12-tonne beam, a crane and a little push

ITER - di, 15/01/2019 - 10:24


There is nothing remarkable about lifting a 12-tonne beam. Except when it happens in the spectacular setting of the ITER Assembly Hall, and the beam needs to be fitted with extreme precision into a structure as monumental as the ITER sector sub-assembly tools.
Towering 22 metres above ground, the vacuum vessel sector sub-assembly tools (SSATs) are formidable handling machines that will be used to pre-assemble vacuum vessel sectors with a pair of toroidal field coils and thermal shield segments before integration in the machine.
The assembly of SSAT-1 began in November 2017 and is now complete. Work on its identical twin SSAT-2 started in September the following year and is now entering its final phase.
Part of Korea's contribution to ITER, the tools are assembled by French contractor CNIM. Lessons learned from SSAT-1 have reduced assembly time for SSAT-2 by approximately one-third.
On Wednesday 9 January, installation operations began for some of the last elements: two 12-tonne beams that stabilize the massive pillars of the machine.
Click here to watch a video of the installation.

Successful outcome for Blanket Shield Module Procedures Qualification

F4E News - ma, 14/01/2019 - 01:00
The qualification related to the fabrication of the Electron Cyclotron Upper Launcher Blanket Shield Module is now successfully concluded.

Pre-Compression Rings facility ready. Let the tests begin!

F4E News - wo, 09/01/2019 - 01:00
ITER Organization, F4E and CNIM unveil tooling that will put components under pressure.

Toroidal field coils | First ITER magnet arrives this year

ITER - ma, 07/01/2019 - 16:59


A major milepost is projected for 2019 as the first of ITER's powerful, high-field magnets is scheduled to arrive from Japan. Let's take a look behind the scenes at the last-stage fabrication activities that are mobilizing the expertise and skill of heavy industry specialists under the responsibility of Japanese QST, the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology.
Eleven years after completing the signatures on documents specifying technical and quality control requirements for the supply of nine toroidal field coils, the Japanese Domestic Agency is overseeing the last, spectacular sequences on its first production unit.
The toroidal field coils are the ITER magnets responsible for confining the plasma inside the vacuum vessel using high-performance, internally cooled superconductors called CICC (cable-in-conduit) conductors. Following the completion of the single largest superconductor procurement in industrial history, fabrication of the final coils is proceeding in Japan (9 toroidal field coils plus 10 coil structures to be sent to Europe) and Europe (10 toroidal field coils). Each coil is made up of a superconducting winding pack and surrounding stainless steel coil case.
The list of applicable superlatives is long—the toroidal field coils are the largest and most powerful superconductive magnets ever designed, with a stored magnetic energy of 41 GJ and a nominal peak field of 11.8 T. Together they weigh in at over 6,000 tonnes including superstructure, representing 60 percent of the magnetic array on the machine and over one-fourth of the Tokamak's total weight. They require 4.57 km of conductor per coil wound into 134 turns in the central core, or winding pack, of the magnet. And they have required the longest procurement lead-time of any ITER component, with six out of seven ITER Members involved in the production of 500 tonnes of niobium-tin superconducting strand (100,000 km) required for the toroidal field superconducting cables. The first winding pack to come off the assembly line in Japan is currently undergoing final inspection by the industrial consortium of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries/Mitsubishi Electric Corporation. The final sequence of testing involved high voltage tests, helium leak tests, and finally cryogenic tests, during which the winding pack is inserted into a cryostat (see top photo) and cooled to 80 K (-193 ˚ C) to confirm leak tightness. With the successful end of cold testing, the winding pack is now undergoing post-cold-test helium leak tests and high voltage tests and will soon be ready for assembly with its toroidal field coil case. Five other winding packs are in various stages of production.

The 200-tonne case assemblies are also in series production. After successful fitting tests early last year, two have been delivered to Europe for insertion activities and a third will arrive this month; another completed production unit will remain at MItsubishi for the assembly of the Japanese coil that is due at ITER in 2019. The fitting tests are the most delicate stage in the coil case manufacturing process, demonstrating that sub-assemblies manufactured and welded at different factory sites can be successfully paired with gap tolerances as strict as 0.25 to 0.75 mm along 15-metre weld grooves.

Please see the gallery below for a full update on manufacturing progress.

From the crane | When dusk falls

ITER - ma, 17/12/2018 - 20:46

There is a magic moment at dusk when the ITER site lights up and the sky still retains some of the light of day. Details that were washed out by the intense daylight or buried in the deep shade jump to the eye as warm yellowish sodium lights, white halogen and the occasional blue-green glow of a welding torch combine to create an unreal atmosphere.

Although familiar by now, this view has no equivalent in the world. This is a giant tokamak being constructed—a unique venture with unique features that the camera loves to capture.

The walk-around continues in the gallery below.


Poland rallies support for Big Science projects

F4E Events - ma, 17/12/2018 - 01:00
ITER, CERN and ESS business opportunities get the attention of a vibrant high-tech community.

Poland rallies support for Big Science projects

F4E Events - ma, 17/12/2018 - 01:00
ITER, CERN and ESS business opportunities get the attention of a vibrant high-tech community.

Operation Insertion accomplished

F4E News - wo, 12/12/2018 - 01:00
Europe unveils ITER Toroidal Field coil in its stainless steel case - a first in the history of the project.

Operation Insertion accomplished

F4E News - wo, 12/12/2018 - 01:00
Europe unveils ITER Toroidal Field coil is in its stainless steel case - a first in the history of the project.

Tokamak Pit | Big steel elbow in place

ITER - ma, 10/12/2018 - 22:01

A cryostat feedthrough delivered by the Chinese Domestic Agency has become the first metal component of the machine to be installed in the Tokamak Pit, in an operation orchestrated over two weeks by the ITER Organization.
An activity that began with the transfer of the component to the vicinity of the Tokamak Complex—and that was pursued as the 10-metre, 6.6-tonne component was introduced into the Pit through an opening in the bioshield roof—has now been concluded through the final positioning of the feeder segment in the building.
In the final lift sequence, the elbow-shaped component was lifted by the monorail crane at the bottom of the Tokamak Pit, rotated above the cryostat crown, and lowered into a slim opening that had been left in the concrete circle in anticipation of this very installation sequence. Positioned on a temporary support tool supplied by the Korean Domestic Agency, technicians used cables to draw the horizontal segment of the feedthrough into the bioshield opening, while the vertical segment fell into place between the crown and the bioshield. (See more detail in the photo gallery below.)
Final adjustments were performed through metrology measurements to fall within +/- 2 mm with respect to the Tokamak Global Coordinate System.
If magnet feeders are the essential lifelines of the ITER magnets—carrying electricity, cryogenic fluids and instrumentation cables—"feedthroughs" are the part of the feeder assemblies that cross through the bioshield and the cryostat. This first completed unit had been delivered last year to the Magnet Infrastructure Facilities for ITER (MIFI) where, as a first-of-a-kind component, it underwent high-voltage tests, leak tests and endoscopic inspection.
Ultimately, the feedthrough will be joined by two other components—an in-cryostat feeder (nearest the vacuum vessel) and a coil termination box (outside the bioshield)—to connect to poloidal field coil #4, one of the two largest of the machine's six poloidal field coils (24 metres in diameter.
"A large number of actors played a critical role in the installation operation that concluded last week," notes Bruno Levesy, Group Leader of the In-Cryostat Assembly Section, with satisfaction. "The Domestic Agencies of China (fabrication) and Korea (tooling), the ITER Organization logistics provider DAHER (transport), European Domestic Agency building contractors, ITER's Construction Management-as-Agent contractor, and the French company CNIM, which won the early works contract in the Tokamak Pit. Giobatta Lanfranco (Construction Team) and Bruno were the most involved staff members of the ITER Organization. "It has been a good practice in coordination for the many activities to come."

ITER Remote Handling experts discuss mix of technologies to cope with radiation

F4E Events - vr, 07/12/2018 - 01:00
Europe unveils electronics and cameras that could do the job.

ITER Remote Handling experts discuss mix of technologies to cope with radiation

F4E Events - vr, 07/12/2018 - 01:00
Europe unveils electronics and cameras that could do the job.

Manufacturing | In the cradle of the cryostat

ITER - ma, 03/12/2018 - 17:51


On the northwestern coast of India, facing the Arabian Peninsula, Hazira is one of the subcontinent's major industrial hubs. Under the still-blazing autumn sun, the landscape is one of refineries, shipyards, power plants, storage tanks and endless queues of oil and container trucks. It is here, at the Larsen & Toubro Ltd manufacturing complex, that a critical ITER component is taking shape.   Between ocean and mangrove, amidst a world of dust and rust, the Larsen & Toubro Ltd "campus" is like an oasis of green and cool. In the mid-1980s, the mammoth Indian conglomerate drained close to one thousand acres of marshland to establish this multi-facility complex.   Thirty years later, the place is a unique aggregation of manufacturing facilities that turn out offshore oil platforms at the rate of 10 to 12 per year and manufacture ships, submarines, tanks, giant boilers and turbines ...   At one kilometre long, the west campus' special steels and forging facility is one of the largest in the world. In an atmosphere that mixes space-age technology with a 19th century steel mill atmosphere, "manipulators" the size of freight train locomotives slowly move amidst giant furnaces and massive steel ingots laid to cool on sand beds. The facility produces more than 40,000 tonnes of finished forgings annually.   Across the road on the east campus, administrative buildings, fabrication facilities, workshops and port installations cover close to one hundred hectares.   This environment is the cradle of the ITER cryostat, the largest of the Tokamak's components—a giant, leak-tight cylinder 30 metres high and 30 metres in diameter that will act as a "thermos" to insulate the ultra-cold magnets from the environment.   From humble beginnings in the form of ingots that look strangely like truncated Doric columns, to the shining stainless steel segments ready to be shipped to the ITER site, it all happens here.   _To_148_Tx_Since late 2015, segments for the ITER cryostat's base section and lower cylinder have been successively forged, machined, finalized, shipped to the ITER construction site, and assembled and welded in the onsite Cryostat Workshop.   In December 2013, as the first mockups were produced to demonstrate and validate welding and manufacturing sequences and techniques, Madhukar Kotwal, then president of Larsen & Toubro Heavy Engineering, told Newsline that despite the company's accumulated experience in manufacturing nuclear and space components, the ITER cryostat was so "special" that it presented unprecedented challenges, both technical and organizational.   Five years later, the challenges have been met and overcome and the manufacturing of the segments for the "huge assembly" of the ITER cryostat is nearing its end.   In the east campus, inside Medium Fabrication Shop #4, work is now underway on the last two orders that Larsen & Toubro is filling for the ITER cryostat: seven segments of the 490-tonne upper cylinder are packed and ready for dispatch; another two are undergoing finishing works and inspections; a segment prototype for the 655-tonne top lid is in the last stage of fabrication; and various tasks are being performed on the "ribs," "flanges," "knuckles," and "crown" that make up a top lid segment (see further technical detail in the photo gallery below.)   Although 7,000 kilometres and three and a half time zones stand between the Larsen & Toubro teams in Hazira and those on the ITER worksite, communication between them is constant. "We have a conference call every single working day," says Chirag Patel, the Larsen & Toubro project manager for the ITER cryostat and in-wall-shielding (see box). "And we will soon be implementing Wi-Fi-connected viewing goggles that will enable us to have a better visual assessment of the ongoing works in the Cryostat Workshop at ITER."   In the summer of 2019, the 12 top lid segments will be shipped to ITER, marking the end of a formidable industrial venture that has spanned two continents and involved hundreds of specialists in both Hazira and at the ITER site in Saint-Paul-lez-Durance.   Click here to watch the "Made in India" video.  


Ions to travel through 8960 holes at top energy

F4E News - ma, 03/12/2018 - 01:00
F4E together with ALSYOM-SEIV will deliver the powerful beam source for ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility.

Ions to travel through 8960 holes at top energy

F4E News - ma, 03/12/2018 - 01:00
F4E together with ALSYOM-SEIV will deliver the powerful beam source for ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility.

Fusion makes its introduction in COP24

F4E Events - vr, 30/11/2018 - 01:00
F4E Director presents “Fusion: Abundant, Safe and Sustainable Energy for the future” in key publication

Fusion makes its introduction in COP24

F4E Events - vr, 30/11/2018 - 01:00
F4E Director presents “Fusion: Abundant, Safe and Sustainable Energy for the future” in key publication

Diagnostic port plugs | Remote handling confirmed

ITER - ma, 26/11/2018 - 21:28



The ITER Organization is putting a number of its planned remote handling activities to the test in a five-year collaboration* with the UK Atomic Energy Authority's RACE facility. The first implementing agreement of the collaboration has concluded successfully.

In a vast workshop in Oxfordshire, after months of fine-tuning, RACE team members successfully carried out two days of demonstrations on a mockup stand that reproduces a small part of ITER—the Hot Cell Complex assembly/disassembly zone where remote maintenance will be carried out on ITER's diagnostic port plugs.

In the presence of ITER Organization witnesses from the remote handling, diagnostics and test breeding blanket sections, the team demonstrated the vertical handling of heavy loads, including removal and insertion to tight tolerances. The goal of the trials was to confirm the compatibility of system designs with planned maintenance solutions, allowing the systems to advance to final design activities and manufacturing.

"For systems requiring remote maintenance and refurbishment it is important that remote handling requirements be taken into account early in the design phase to reduce risk of costly adaptations later," says remote handling engineer David Hamilton, who coordinates the collaboration with RACE. "All participants—ITER Remote Handling as well as ITER system owners—are fully engaged in getting the most value and benefit out of this work."

Many of ITER's diagnostics will be mounted in the port openings of the vacuum vessel, supported within "port plugs" weighing up to 48 tonnes that can be removed from the Tokamak for maintenance. The diagnostic components will be integrated into drawer-like structures—diagnostic shielding modules—each carrying two plasma-facing walls.

Once delivered to the Hot Cell Complex, the port plugs will be supported vertically while maintenance or refurbishment activities are carried out. The task at RACE focused on the insertion/removal of (mock) diagnostic shielding modules from the plug, and the insertion/removal of diagnostic first walls from the shielding modules, using a crane and manipulator arms. The stand faithfully reproduces all the "critical" parts of the operation—the size and weight of the components, for example, and all interfacing features and tolerances as detailed by ITER Organization specifications.

The demonstrations can be considered a full success.

"The trials allowed us to verify that the vertical insertion and removal operations, as planned by ITER, went smoothly, with no hang-ups or jams," confirmed Hamilton. "Useful suggestions were also made during the design, fabrication and operation of the test stand relating to the remote handling compatibility of the components and to planned procedures and tooling; these suggestions will be incorporated as we move forward."

Additional implementation agreements are underway relating to the remote maintenance of the vacuum vessel pressure suppression system; the feasibility of cutting and welding diagnostic first wall cooling pipes; the remote handling of vacuum flanges; synthetic viewing; test blanket module replacement, and—most recently—the maintenance of the first plasma diagnostic service modules.

"Seeing these trials take place at full scale and under realistic remote handling conditions gives us real confidence in the component designs and our proposed remote handling methods." says Jim Palmer, ITER's Remote Handling Section Leader. "There comes a point in any design when paper studies can only tell you so much and the only way to fully validate a remote handling process is to really try it out."

RACE also recently concluded work under a contract with the European Domestic Agency (Fusion for Energy) to test the maintenance of diagnostics inside the European diagnostic shield modules. Please see a full report here.

*According to the terms of the UKAEA-ITER Organization collaboration, RACE will test and evaluate remote handling system designs, and conduct remote handling trials of generic and specific maintenance tasks in order to demonstrate the feasibility of remote handling tasks and provide operational feedback to the system designers.

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