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Steel giants arrive on ITER site

F4E News - ma, 20/05/2019 - 02:00
The massive roof pillars of the Tokamak building are here.

ITER physics school | Ten years of lectures now available

ITER - ma, 13/05/2019 - 18:58

The lectures from ten ITER International Schools held since 2007 have been collected and are now available through a dedicated webpage on the ITER website.
In anticipation of the beginning of ITER's construction, the Aix-Marseille University and the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) together with ITER Organization launched a series of "ITER International Schools," whose main goal is to offer advanced graduate students, recent PhDs, and young researchers a complete picture of both the theoretical and experimental aspects of tokamak physics. The school aims at preparing young researchers to tackle the current and anticipated challenges at magnetic fusion devices, and spreading the global knowledge required for the effective exploitation of ITER's scientific potential.
The ITER International School (IIS) is jointly hosted and organized every two years by the Aix-Marseille University and the ITER Organization and alternates between Aix-en-Provence, France, and sites within the ITER Members. The first ITER school—in July 2007 in Aix-en-Provence, France—was organized on the topic of turbulent transport in fusion plasmas. Nine different editions have followed: Fukuoka, Japan, on magnetic confinement (2008); Aix-en-Provence on plasma-surface interactions (2009); Austin, Texas (US) on magneto-hydro-dynamics (2010); Aix-en-Provence on energetic particles (2011); Ahmedabad, India, on radio-frequency heating (2012); Aix-en-Provence on high performance computing in fusion science (2014); Hefei, China, on transport and pedestal physics in tokamaks (2015); Aix-en-Provence on the physics of disruptions and control (2017); and, finally, Daejeon (Korea) on physics and technology of power flux handling in tokamaks (2019). The next ITER International School is planned in Aix-en-Provence, France, in 2020.
Over the last decade, the school has covered a very wide range of topics in the areas of experimental and modelling fusion physics and engineering. The choice of ''school format'' for IIS was adopted due to the need to prepare future scientists/engineers on a range of different topics and to provide them with a wide overview of the interdisciplinary skills required by the ITER Project.
The lecturers at the schools are leading specialists from research organizations within the ITER Members and from the ITER Organization. Their lectures, together with the proceedings published for some school editions, represent a wealth of knowledge on fusion and ITER. The ITER Organization and Aix-Marseille University, supported by the organizers and lecturers at the past schools, have thus taken action to collect this priceless knowledge and make it accessible for future generations of fusion scientists and engineers, particularly for post-graduate students and young researchers who are the primary attendants of the schools.
The ITER Organization and Aix Marseille University would like to warmly thank the school organizers and lecturers at the ten ITER International Schools for making the lectures available.
Please see the new resource on the ITER website here.

Beam operations resume at LIPAc

F4E News - vr, 10/05/2019 - 02:00
Delegates from Europe and Japan follow the action from the control room.

Beam operations resume at LIPAc

F4E News - vr, 10/05/2019 - 02:00
Delegates from Europe and Japan follow the action from the control room.

JT-60SA’s heaviest component, the central solenoid, now inserted

F4E News - di, 07/05/2019 - 02:00
JT-60SA's single heaviest component, the central solenoid, has been inserted into the heart of the machine today.

JT-60SA’s heaviest component, the central solenoid, now inserted

F4E News - di, 07/05/2019 - 02:00
JT-60SA's single heaviest component, the central solenoid, has been inserted into the heart of the machine today.

Central solenoid | First of 7 modules completed

ITER - ma, 06/05/2019 - 18:58


When ITER begins operations in 2025, its plasma will be initiated by the largest stacked pulsed superconducting magnet ever built—the ITER central solenoid. The US ITER magnets team, based at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is overseeing the fabrication of the central solenoid modules, support structures, and assembly tooling. A major milestone was reached this spring when vendor General Atomics completed fabrication of the first of seven modules.
"General Atomics has done an outstanding job to reach the difficult and important milestone of completing module 1 fabrication," said Wayne Reiersen, US ITER Central Solenoid Magnets Team Leader. "This is the culmination of an eight-year effort involving concurrent engineering of the module design, the creation of a facility in which these powerful superconducting magnets could be built and tested, the qualification of the manufacturing processes, and the building of this first-of-a-kind module."
The next step for the module is intensive testing to ensure that the component is ready to perform in the ITER Tokamak. The module has already completed the first Paschen voltage test as well as a global leak test.
The central solenoid will be installed in the centre of the ITER machine, and will drive up to 45,000 amps of current in each module during plasma operation. Six modules will be stacked to form the 17-metre-tall solenoid, while the seventh module will serve as a spare.
Fabrication of each module requires multiple fabrication steps spread out over 24 months. 
For a detailed view of the module manufacturing process, see "Building the Heart of ITER" on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory YouTube channel.

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